5$ Pneumatic Tire, 130. Anniversary

2 oz Ag 999

Available
5$ Pneumatic Tire - 130. Anniversary
Denomination
5 $
Country
Niue Island
Metal
Ag 999
Weight
62,2 g
Size
Ø 36 mm
Quality
Antique Finish
Additions
Rubber
Mintage
500 pcs
Date of issue
2018-01
Accessories
Certificate, Box
Price: 1,199.00 PLN
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This beautiful 2 Oz Silver coin is dedicated to the 130th Anniversary of the invention of the first pneumatic tyre by Irish inventor John Dunlop. The coin features a wonderful rubber band insert, has an incredible design, has an Antique Finish quality and comes in a themed case, along with the Certificate of Authenticity. Limited mintage of only 500 pieces worldwide.

A tire (American English) or tyre (British English; see spelling differences) is a ring-shaped component that surrounds a wheel's rim to transfer a vehicle's load from the axle through the wheel to the ground and to provide traction on the surface traveled over. Most tires, such as those for automobiles and bicycles, are pneumatically inflated structures, which also provide a flexible cushion that absorbs shock as the tire rolls over rough features on the surface. Tires provide a footprint that is designed to match the weight of the vehicle with the bearing strength of the surface that it rolls over by providing a bearing pressure that will not deform the surface excessively. The materials of modern pneumatic tires are synthetic rubber, natural rubber, fabric and wire, along with carbon black and other chemical compounds. They consist of a tread and a body. The tread provides traction while the body provides containment for a quantity of compressed air. Before rubber was developed, the first versions of tires were simply bands of metal fitted around wooden wheels to prevent wear and tear. Early rubber tires were solid (not pneumatic). Pneumatic tires are used on many types of vehicles, including cars, bicycles, motorcycles, buses, trucks, heavy equipment, and aircraft. Metal tires are still used on locomotives and railcars, and solid rubber (or other polymer) tires are still used in various non-automotive applications, such as some casters, carts, lawnmowers, and wheelbarrows.

 

 

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